Guilt by Association

by rjs
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Published on: February 10, 2012

Guilt by Association

The Uncommon Sense of the Immortal Mullah NasruddinOne night, Nasruddin’s beloved little grey donkey was stolen. Instead of consoling Nasruddin, the wags in the teahouse the next morning offered only words of remonstration.

“As they say, ‘Take care of your donkey, it will carry you from Morocco to Mecca.’ So Mullah, why didn’t you take care to tie up the donkey securely?” asked Ali, the teahouse keeper.

“How could you have slept through the theft of your beloved ass, Nasruddin?” said Faik.

“You should have replaced the rotting door on your shed, Nasruddin,” commented Hamza.

“I bet you didn’t even close the bolt on the shed door,” accused Hussein. “That’ll teach you.”

“You were just asking for someone to break in, the way you neglect to secure your stable,” added Nasruddin’s uncle, Mesut.

Nasruddin listened to the wags’ criticism for a while, and then stood up and said, “Enough! Obviously, it’s completely unfair to blame me alone, or even primarily, for the theft of my donkey.”

“Tell us, Nasruddin,” said Ali, “who else was responsible?”

“Don’t you think the thief was at least a tiny bit guilty in all this,” the Mullah replied, “or was he entirely innocent in your view‽”

Excerpted from The Uncommon Sense of the Immortal Mullah Nasruddin: Stories, Jests, and Donkey Tales of the Beloved Persian Folk Hero

 

   Your Daily Nasruddin   

There are a handful of stories about the loss of Karakacan, Nasruddin’s beloved little grey donkey. She’s often described as old, feeble, and resistant, and seems to lose her way much more often than, say, my donkey, if I had one. Still the old burro has the same sort of indomitable spirit as Nasruddin, always seeming to return just in time for the next story.

Nasruddin settles the question among a number of conflicting opinions among his neighbors and fellow villagers in the community. He almost always gets the last word!

Find It or Else

by rjs
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Published on: September 9, 2011

Find It or Else

Once Nasruddin was traveling on business when he rushed into the local teahouse in a panic, yelling, “I have misplaced my saddlebag! You must find it for me at once, or else — I know what I’ll do! If I don’t find it, by Allah! I’ll have to —”

“Don’t panic, Mullah, no need for desperate measures,” Hussein assured him. “I’ll help you find your old saddlebag. Now just sit down and think for a moment: where was your bag the last time you saw it?”

So he helped Nasruddin retrace his steps, and sure enough, they found the saddlebag, right where he left it.

As they returned to the teahouse, Hussein asked, “What were you saying that you would have done if we hadn’t found your saddlebag, Nasruddin?”

“Well, I would have had to cut up an old kilim rug I have in my shed and stitch it together to make a new one.”

Excerpted from The Uncommon Sense of the Immortal Mullah Nasruddin: Stories, Jests, and Donkey Tales of the Beloved Persian Folk Hero

    Your Daily Nasruddin   

This story shows how you may threaten people to get them to help you. Just say, “Or else…!” in an agitated or even slightly insane manner, then trail off and never complete your statement. But after you acheive your goal, when someone confronts you asking what the alternative was, smile and tell the truth.

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